WMAP

First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations:
Preliminary Maps and Basic Results

C.L. Bennett, et al., 2003, ApJS, 148, 1

reprint (5.6 Mb) / preprint (4.4 Mb) / individual figures / ADS / astro-ph

WMAP First-year Paper Figures, Bennett, et al.

Individual figures are provided for use in talks. Proper display of PNG transparency in PowerPoint requires saving files to your computer before Inserting them. Please acknowledge the WMAP Science Team when using these images.

Bennet Fig.1
An overview of the WMAP data flow. The references are: (1) Barnes et al. (2003) (2) Bennett et al. (2003b)(3) Bennett et al. (2003c) (4) Hinshaw et al. (2003b) (5) Hinshaw et al. (2003a) (6) Jarosik et al. (2003b) (7) Kogut et al. (2003) (8) Komatsu et al. (2003) (9) Page et al. (2003a) (10) Page et al. (2003b) (11) Peiris et al. (2003) (12) Verde et al. (2003).
PNG (57 kb - 688x900 pixels)
PNG (107 kb - 1147x1500 pixels)
EPS (147 kb)
Bennet Fig. 2a
WMAP K-band sky map in a Mollweide projection in Galactic coordinates.
PNG (239 kb - 304x512 pixels)
PNG (1.1 mb - 607x1024 pixels)
EPS (413 kb)
Bennet Fig. 2b
WMAP Ka-band sky map in a Mollweide projection in Galactic coordinates.
PNG (283 kb - 304x512 pixels)
PNG (1.4 mb - 607x1024 pixels)
EPS (477 kb)
Bennet Fig. 2c
WMAP Q-band sky map in a Mollweide projection in Galactic coordinates.
PNG (298 kb - 304x512 pixels)
PNG (1.5 mb - 607x1024 pixels)
EPS (497 kb)
Bennet Fig. 2d
WMAP V-band sky map in a Mollweide projection in Galactic coordinates.
PNG (312 kb - 304x512 pixels)
PNG (1.6 mb - 607x1024 pixels)
EPS (535 kb)
Bennet Fig. 2e
WMAP W-band sky map in a Mollweide projection in Galactic coordinates.
PNG (312 kb - 304x512 pixels)
PNG (1.6 mb 607x1024 pixels)
EPS (556 kb)
Bennet Fig. 3
The number of independent observations per pixel in Galactic coordinates. The number of observations is greatest at the ecliptic poles and in rings around the ecliptic poles with diameters corresponding to the separation angle of the two optical boresight directions (approximately 141°). The observations are the most sparse in the ecliptic plane. Small area cuts are apparent where Mars, Saturn, Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune data are masked so as not to contaminate CMB analyses. Jupiter data are used for beam mapping. The histogram of the sky sampling shows the departures from uniform sky coverage.
PNG (182 kb - 460x512 pixels)
PNG (925 kb 919x1024 pixels)
EPS (117 kb)
Bennet Fig. 4
A guide to the microwave sky for reference. This picture shows the large-scale emission from the Milky Way galaxy, including some of its notable components such as the Cygnus complex, the North Polar Spur, the Gum region, etc. The small circles show positions of the microwave point sources detected by WMAP (Bennett et al. 2003c). The brighter sources are labeled for reference.
PNG (90 kb - 516x1024 pixles)
PNG (89 kb - 1033x2048 pixels)
EPS (252 kb)
Bennet Fig. 5
A comparison of the K-band map with the Ka-band map smoothed to K-band resolution, both in thermodynamic temperature, shows the dramatic reduction of Galactic contamination with increased frequency. The comparison also shows the similarity of the CMB fluctuation features at high Galactic latitude.
PNG (356 kb - 449x512 pixels)
PNG (1.6 mb - 898x1024 pixels)
EPS (386 kb)
Bennet Fig. 6
A comparison of the Q-band, V-band, and W-band maps. All three maps are smoothed to Q-band resolution and are in thermodynamic temperature. The reduction of Galactic contamination relative to K-band and Ka-band (Figure 5) is apparent. The maps show that the constant features across bands are CMB anisotropy while the thermodynamic temperature of the foregrounds depends on the band (frequency).
PNG (527 kb - 451x640 pixels)
PNG (1.4 mb - 722x1024 pixels)
EPS (660 kb)
Bennet Fig. 7
A comparison of the COBE 53 GHz map (Bennett et al. 1996) with the W-band WMAP map. The WMAP map has 30 times finer resolution than the COBE map.
PNG (440 kb - 512x627 pixels)
PNG (1.4 mb - 836x1024 pixels)
EPS (320 kb)
Bennet Fig. 8
The COBE-DMR 53 GHz map (Bennett et al. 1996) is shown along with a map made with a linear combination of the Q-band and V-band WMAP maps to mimic a 53 GHz map. Note the strong similarity of the maps.
PNG (332 kb - 614x640 pixels)
PNG (928 kb - 982x1024 pixels)
EPS (166 kb)
Bennet Fig. 9
The difference map is shown between the COBE-DMR 53 GHz map and the combination Q-band/V-band maps from Figure 8. This is compared with a map of the noise level. The maps are consistent with one another with the exception of a feature in the galatic plane. This discrepancy is likely to be due to a spectral index that is sufficiently different from the assumed CMB spectrum used to combine the WMAP Q-band and V-band maps to mimic a 53 GHz map.
PNG (340 kb - 572x640 pixels)
PNG (949 kb - 916x1024 pixels)
EPS (151 kb)
Bennet Fig. 10
False color images represent the spectral information from mutliple WMAP bands. Q-band is red, V-band is green, and W-band is blue. A CMB thermodynamic spectrum is grey. (top) A three color combination image from the Q-, V-, and W-band maps. The dipole and high Galactic latitude anisotropy are seen. (bottom) A similar false color image but with the dipole subtracted.
PNG (325 kb - 512x528 pixels)
PNG (1.1 mb - 993x1024 pixels)
EPS (137 kb)
Bennet Fig. 11
This “internal linear combination” map combines the five band maps in such as way as to maintain unity response to the CMB while minimizing foreground contamination. For a more detailed description see Bennett et al. (2003c). For the region that covers the full sky outside of the inner Galactic plane, the weights are 0.109, -0.684, -0.096, 1.921, -0.250 for K, Ka, Q, V, and Wbands, respectively. Note that there is a chance alignment of a particularly warm feature and a cool feature near the Galactic plane. As discussed in Bennett et al. (2003c), the noise properties of this map are complex, so it should not generally be used for cosmological analyses.
PNG (292 kb - 304x512 pixels)
PNG (1.3 mb - 607x1024 pixels)
EPS (357 kb)
Bennet Fig. 12
The WMAP angular power spectrum. (top:) The WMAP temperature (TT) results are consistent with the ACBAR and CBI measurements, as shown. The TT angular power spectrum is now highly constrained. Our best fit running index ΛCDM model is shown. The grey band represents the cosmic variance expected for that model. The quadrupole has a surprisingly low amplitude. Also, there are excursions from a smooth spectrum (e.g., at l ≈ 40 and l ≈ 210) that are only slightly larger than expected statistically. While intriguing, they may result from a combination of cosmic variance, subdominant astrophysical processes, and small effects from approximations made for this first year data analysis (Hinshaw et al. 2003b). We do not attach cosmological significance to them at present. More integration time and more detailed analyses are needed. (bottom:) The temperature-polarization (TE) cross-power spectrum, (l + 1)Cl/2π. (Note that this is not multiplied by the additional factor of l.) The peak in the TE spectrum near l ~ 300 is out of phase with the TT power spectrum, as predicted for adiabatic initial conditions. The antipeak in the TE spectrum near l ~ 150 is evidence for superhorizon modes at decoupling, as predicted by inflationary models.
PNG (15 kb - 806x1024 pixels)
PNG (35 kb - 1613x2048 pixels)
EPS (52 kb)
Bennet Fig. 13
(top): CMB temperature correlation function of the WMAP and COBE data. The WMAP correlation function is computed using a combination of the Q-band, V-band, and W-band maps with the Kp0 cut sky and the MEM Galactic model subtracted. The COBE correlation function is computed using the “custom cut” sky. The running index ΛCDM model that is fit to the power spectrum is shown with a Monte Carlo determined grey band indicating one standard deviation. The model is, overall, an excellent fit to the WMAP power spectrum. However, a correlation plot emphasizes the low l power. The discrepancy between the model and data illustrates that there is surprisingly little anisotropy power in the WMAP and COBE maps at large angles. (bottom): The lower two plots display the correlation function of the difference between the COBE-DMR and WMAP maps with a |b| = 10° Galactic plane cut. A synthesis of the WMAP Q and V band maps was made to approximate a 53 GHz-like map to compare with the COBE-DMR 53 GHz map. The COBE-DMR 90 GHz map is compared directly, without corrections, to the WMAP W-band map. These plots emphasize the consistency of the WMAP and COBE measurements. The slightly higher than expected deviations at 53 GHz are likely to be due to Galactic contamination, arising from outside the cut regions and from the construction of the synthesized WMAP 53 GHz map.
PNG (15 kb - 631x1024 pixels)
PNG (33 kb - 1263x2048 pixels)
EPS (30 kb)
A service of the HEASARC and of the Astrophysics Science Division at NASA/GSFC
Goddard Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
HEASARC Director: Dr. Alan P. Smale
LAMBDA Director: Dr. David T. Chuss
NASA Official: Dr. David T. Chuss
Web Curator: Mr. Michael R. Greason